sunny sensory

Sunny weather is here… it has been incredibly hot in the last few days. So I’ve been reminding myself of all the sensory rich go-to activities we enjoy outside – and have been looking for inspiration for new ones!

Get creative!

  • water painting the patio (& walls, stones, benches, windows…anything that stays still long enough!) Just a plastic container for water & a range of different sized brushes or sponges. We also enjoy dipping biscuit cutters into the water and ‘printing’ their shapes, or of course getting hands and feet wet enough to print with them. Pictures dry up quite quickly so we never seem to run out of space. Though worth having a camera at the ready to capture pictures they don’t want to lose…

 

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T’s wonderful water painting of a bicycle

  • sand pit play is always a winner. Great for digging, mixing, building and shaping. Great for storytelling type play with action figures or dolls or toy animals. It’s also a great place to remember Bible stories together in that wind down part of the day.

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  • Painting & decorating! Painting outside can go big. Paint onto card, or large paper, or an old sheet. Get a great big box and cut a door into it, then paint away – add windows with views, pictures on the walls, brick work… wherever your imagination takes you. When it is dry bring out dressing up clothes & a picnic and enjoy your new playhouse…
  • Texture treasure hunts don’t need any planning at all! A piece of paper each, a box of wax crayons, and ready steady GO! See how many different textures or patterns you can take a rubbing of as you fill the paper up like a patchwork. If it needs to be a competition a prize for the most, or a prize for the most unusual textures, or the best patchwork design…

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Get wet!

  • dolls laundry. A big bowl of warm soapy water – the more bubbles the better – and a pile of dolls clothes; a clothes airer and pegs. I always make sure there’s a towel to hand for all the moments when it gets too much and hands or faces need to be dried before starting again. We use a toy shopping basket as a washing basket – it looks a little like mine, and I have a small peg basket with a handle which is great to play with. And of course my pegs are all sorts of colours so there’s fun to be had choosing pairs to go with the clothes, or deciding which side of the airer has to have which colour.

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  • Aquaplay. We were given a playset a number of years ago now, which clips together to create canal systems – each time can be a different configuration. It has straight and curvy pieces, locks, gates, boats, and water pumps. Once you have clipped it all how you want it you fill the system with water and can move the boats around, bring cargo from one side to the other, take action figures on boating holidays etc. It is wonderfully absorbing, has a rhythm and order to the way you have to move the water through the locks to get your boats round. Great play value. (Just had a quick look, and it’s still available to buy)

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  • paddling and pools are brilliant, especially when in the shade so you don’t have to worry too much about sun cream (the nature of kids with sensory cravings is that they often have strong sensory defensiveness too – and for us sun cream is one of those). Again, have towels at the ready, the end of this kind of play often comes abruptly & urgently in my experience. Balls, dolls, pouring, mixing, splashing, floating/sinking objects – and so many more ways to play. Put a paddling pool on a slight slope and you have water that meets land – a barbie beach, an animal watering hole…

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  • Ice cube arctic. Another paddling pool idea, but could also work in a sensory bin or tray. We collect flowers, stones, pebbles, feathers, cut up bits of drinking straws, glitter, small toy animals etc and put them into a variety of plastic containers – all sorts of sizes and shapes. Pour water in and pop in the freezer. When ready (I have put them in to freeze during the morning and got them out after school but really they last longer if left in to freeze right through.) get them all out into the paddling pool or tray along with other toy animals.

Get Trampolining!

  • Wet Trampoline – This gets slippery so careful supervision called for! All you need are full watering cans, and gentle bouncing – or water balloons plus bouncing – or to get the Trampoline wet with the hose before bouncing!
  • Ball pit Trampoline – simple, put ball pit balls (or a mix of different balls but making sure none are too hard or heavy) onto the Trampoline. These are amazing fun to bounce with, and also become (in our house anyway) all sorts of games – colour sorting, lining up, in or out, characters in an imaginary role play game (ie balls in our house all have names and are often at school when on the Trampoline, being moved to & from the shed in a school bus (push along dumper truck), facing time out if naughty, moving around to different lessons, taking turns to be bounced with etc).

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Get making!

  • Mud pies and potions – This activity needs very little resourcing or encouragement. Though I do steer to particular areas of the garden to find mud and stones etc, so my flower beds aren’t all dug up by the end. Similarly rules about which flowers to pick have to be agreed. I am always careful to be very near by just to make sure there is no eating or drinking of the pies and potions either… can never be sure. I am keen to create a mud kitchen over the summer this year, so am enjoying looking at other’s ideas – pinterest is an amazing place – and making plans.
  • Dens – made out of washing lines with big sheets, or clothes airers and blankets, or big cardboard boxes, or play tents. String, pegs, safety pins and stones to weight things down can all be useful.
  • holes – making a hole with a spade or a spoon might sound incredibly dull but believe me it’s absorbing, hard work, and full of interesting treasures – are you digging like an archaeologist looking for artifacts, a pirate looking for treasure or are you a bug hunter? It’s useful to mark out a small patch of the garden where you can live with this activity happening, or perhaps have a large plant pot filled with soil just for this. You might even want to bury some treasure for the digger to find! At the moment we seem to be finding a lot of broken pieces of kitchen or bathroom tiles – each with colour and pattern. They are then washed lovingly with a paintbrush and find their way to the fairy garden with all kinds of other little collected treasures.

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I could keep going – but lunch is calling… what do your kids enjoy, what activities make for perfect sunny sensory for them?

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