making gifts together

We are just beginning to make our plans and preparations for filling shoeboxes with gifts for children which we collect as a church and send around the world with Operation Christmas child.

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homemade flower crayons

This year I am keen to get B, A & T involved more and have been wondering if there are any gift ideas that would be easy enough for us to make together to put in. There’s something prayerful about spending time making something to bless someone else, and those times we do manage it I find it inevitably changes, and blesses us too.

So here’s a list of ideas I’ve found:

  • T-shirt headbands (‘lovestitched’ have an easy to follow tutorial here)
  • T-shirt neckwarmers (needs sewing) (‘lilblueboo’ have a good tutorial here)
  • no sewing tutu skirt (Simply Real Mums have instructions here), the same method can quickly also make a flowy headband, or wrist band.
  • braided bead bracelets (see beadaholic’s video tutorial here)
  • no sewing fleecy pom pom hat (great instructions here from Creative Jewish Mum)
  • homemade shaped crayons (valentine ones on Mumdot here) These can be any shape you have a silicone mold for of course.
  • dolly peg fairies/dolls – sharpies, lace, tulle, felt, wool and imagination! A quick google for ideas revealed lots and lots to be inspired by.
  • wooden car tracks (BuggyandBuddy share their instructions here for wooden track) I was wondering if the same concept could be done with felt pieces, which would mean corner pieces could be made too.
  • lollipop stick puzzles (Mum Endeavors makes some here)
  • a world in a tin/suitcase – you can buy tiny tin suitcases, or use a little tin or large matchbox. Buy a little soft toy or little play figure that will fit in the tin or box, and then use felt, pretty papers and tape to decorate in the tin. Maybe the box will turn into a bed for the little doll, or maybe you have room in the tin for a whole house, or scene for the play figure.
  • baby tag blanket  – will need sewing (‘wholefully’ has a good tutorial here)
  • stacking game made of cotton reels (Handmade Charlotte has instructions and a printable design for beautiful animal mix n match, look here.)

Well, we’ve made a start at having a go at some of these. It’s a great way to stop and chat together, particularly about what the children who get the shoeboxes will be like, and what they will enjoy playing with or using, and where they might live.

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a rainbow tutu headband

 

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Summer Festival

 

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a little patch of blue sky was spotted during the week!

For the last few years we have been going to the Christian summer festival, New Wine. Last Year I was reflecting on how important it has become for us as a family because it is a week of intensive community with our church family (both locally and families who camp with us from other churches). The week following New Wine we meet up with parts of our extended family for another week of camping in lovely Somerset. Inevitably we get chatting about the Christian festivals we each go to, some to Spring Harvest, Word Alive, some to Keswick. This year we chatted a fair amount about the logistics of taking our families – all in some way shaped by additional needs – to such large, noisy, intensive festivals. On paper it sounds mildly ridiculous to attempt such a thing, so what does it work out like in practice?

These are some of the ways we as a family handle the logistics of camping, being in community, going to the meetings and events, sleeping, eating, staying clean enough… and growing in our faith:

Eating

When we first began the adventure of camping the eating side of things was actually really difficult. B has not ever found eating easy, her diet at that time was really very restricted and her usual routine involved managing to eat just enough sitting on her own with the TV on simply to dampen the stress and panic enough to face the food. So eating while camping was tough for her. Most of her ‘safe foods’ were possible to store and prep in a tent so that was something, but of course no TV, no space, family and wider church community right there all the time.

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Plus whenever a bug, fly or wasp came even remotely near her she was panicked. So at first food was eaten (or looked at) rather stressfully outside with the rest of us, but by the end of each mealtime B was usually quite distressed and sitting in the bedroom, zipped in on her own. Over the years this level of stress about camping mealtimes has eased a little and most of the time B manages to join us and eat something. I think in part this is a reflection of a wider change about how B is coping with meals together all the time. Needless to say wasps are still a problem! This year with 5 adults around our table we still had a bit of a job dealing efficiently with them and keeping the meal on track!

As a church group we eat together in ‘family clusters’ – so everyone is included, and supported. This year we had the joy of 3 extra adults eating with us. All known really well by our kids, and all extremely accepting and patient of how our family life happens. Their help was invaluable at mealtimes, getting the food started when Andrew or I were still walking back after fetching T from a group, helping involve the kids in washing up and generally keeping us cheery throughout even the most dysfunctional moments, and bringing the first evening meal so we didn’t need to cook after putting up the tent and sorting the kids out on the day we arrived.

We have a menu that we only have to tweak each year as dietary needs change, and alongside the menu we have 3 shopping lists! One is a list of what needs to be prepared or bought and packed to take with us (we prep 2 main meals in advance and take them frozen.). The second is a shopping list for Andrew to fetch while I register the kids with their groups after the tent has gone up on arrival day. The third is to be bought on the day off, including things to take to the BBQ with our whole church group that evening.

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a bit wet for BBQ but great food & company! (Thank you A.Wall for the photo)

Sleeping

What can I say??? We’re not naturally great at sleeping anyway! This year though we all slept in the same bedroom section and I think, miraculously, we possibly got more sleep than usual!

Washing

There are shower blocks dotted about the showground where New Wine is held. There are also sinks in all the loo blocks which lots of people use for washing faces and doing teeth though we do that in the tent where it’s less crowded and distracting. The showers are quite small and there is almost always a queue, it’s also fair to say that they are a little hit and miss – usually a mixture of hot moments with unpredictable cold ones thrown in. This year we also faced the challenge of some of the showers losing water pressure – not easy with shampoo already applied but only a dribble of water running down the wall to rinse with!

When B, A & T were small enough we took a large-ish flexi bucket for baths in the tent. It was a bit of a slow process heating a few kettles to add to cold water to get the temp right, but it was clean, enough room for me to help, and no queuing, as they grew a small paddling pool also came in handy in a similar way. Now they are all too big, but we have managed finding times to use the showers and have coped. And with T this year I simply haven’t pushed it – baby wipes took care of it! There is a disability accessible shower on site, with enough room for a parent to help a larger child. We may well look into using that next time.

I take travel hand wash detergent with us and try to wash tea towels and any other essentials on the afternoon of the day off. This year was so wet I didn’t get the chance – nothing would have dried. But of course the wet, and the festival mud created a lot of washing, and ‘Our Place’ (New Wine’s inclusion teams) came to the rescue washing the things we really needed – especially T’s ‘apple blanky’ when it was dropped in a puddle.

Meetings

There are kids groups right through from baby to late teens, and registration forms are taken between certain times on arrival day, and the kids are given wrist bands. Most of the groups have a couple of sessions each day, babies fewer and older teens more choices but a similar amount of time.

There is a thorough system of dropping off and collecting, with more than one check of your ID, the handover card you gave in that day, and the child’s wristband. It takes a bit of time but works well. T didn’t like the wristband at all this year, and kept taking it off and ‘putting it somewhere safe’ – so on a couple of the days that she went to her group we had to get her an alternative, approved ID badge from the admin team at the back of the venue.

The groups are very busy and so they are quite noisy even without the music & use of microphones. There are stage lights and live worship bands, and in the younger groups often team in costume for the upfront parts of the session. Kids are in smaller groups with team looking after them and always get dropped off and picked up in that same place with those team members. For the younger groups the sessions are very tightly structured and include upfront storytelling, silly games and worship and prayer and also active games. craft and chat in the smaller groups.

This year T struggled again and we were so very thankful for the Our Place team. Our Place have team in every venue supporting children to help them join in with their group. They also have a break out space near the side or back for times when kids need to escape or some calming down space. They have fidgets, a visual timetable and ear defenders at the ready! We needed support at drop off, and T needed support during the sessions she attended. Our Place also have a separate kids, youth and adult venue that is open a bit later than the others as a safe haven for those who can’t settle or who can’t manage a whole session. T loved the kids venue and most evenings we went there rather than her group having used all her energy up during the rest of the day.

Some mornings were also just too much and we took T with us to the main arena. Getting out my emergency distractions and other little games that I always have to hand.

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B, A & T all have boxes or tins in their rooms where we put all the little oddmenty toys – from those fast food freebies, to the one off homemade and all things small and unique. I pack up a small bag of these when we go for days out or away for longer like these weeks. I also like to have bubbles (the small tubes sold as party favours are great), fidgets, little notebooks and pens (the ones with multiple colours in just one pen are my favourite – space is of the essence, I have to carry it everywhere!). This year A & I turned a little mint tin into a habitat for a tiny dinosaur complete with rocks trees and volcano – a whole world in a tiny portable tin – perfect!

It sometimes feels frustrating that it’s not straight forward getting to sessions I want to get to – this year I didn’t make it to many things in the evenings at all – but over the years I have found these times when I take a little one to an alternative venue (either Our Place, or Stepping Stones when T was little – a large play space, with tea coffee and the main arena being shown live on a screen) to be full of valuable conversation, chances to connect with other parents often feeling the same frustration and the team in these venues just as ready to pray with you and to talk discipleship!

Our Place run seminars for parents in the mornings which have been a place of gentle challenge (ok sometimes challenge never feels gentle!) encouragement and prayerful support. I have grown such a lot in my faith as I have been a part of the Our Place family network. The encouragement and safety of the space they provide has helped me to go on wrestling, to dare to step out and step up, to trust and hope in deeper ways as we share experience together, know that whoever we sit with or pray with there is understanding and acceptance. This year we looked together at the story of Ruth and reflected together on feeling uprooted, the frustration and pot-boundness circumstances can sometimes make us feel; how God provides, often through the support and help of others – like Ruth’s Boaz; and how God turns the situation right around breaking the chains around those women and leading them to fruitfulness. Plenty for me to treasure and to keep on reflecting on in the midst of piles of muddy washing, a garden that has grown quite a bit while we were away, a tent in need of drying, camping gear to put away, a house that is in disarray and trying to help the kids adjust to down time at home, while Andrew goes back to work!

 

 

 

sunny sensory

Sunny weather is here… it has been incredibly hot in the last few days. So I’ve been reminding myself of all the sensory rich go-to activities we enjoy outside – and have been looking for inspiration for new ones!

Get creative!

  • water painting the patio (& walls, stones, benches, windows…anything that stays still long enough!) Just a plastic container for water & a range of different sized brushes or sponges. We also enjoy dipping biscuit cutters into the water and ‘printing’ their shapes, or of course getting hands and feet wet enough to print with them. Pictures dry up quite quickly so we never seem to run out of space. Though worth having a camera at the ready to capture pictures they don’t want to lose…

 

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T’s wonderful water painting of a bicycle

  • sand pit play is always a winner. Great for digging, mixing, building and shaping. Great for storytelling type play with action figures or dolls or toy animals. It’s also a great place to remember Bible stories together in that wind down part of the day.

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  • Painting & decorating! Painting outside can go big. Paint onto card, or large paper, or an old sheet. Get a great big box and cut a door into it, then paint away – add windows with views, pictures on the walls, brick work… wherever your imagination takes you. When it is dry bring out dressing up clothes & a picnic and enjoy your new playhouse…
  • Texture treasure hunts don’t need any planning at all! A piece of paper each, a box of wax crayons, and ready steady GO! See how many different textures or patterns you can take a rubbing of as you fill the paper up like a patchwork. If it needs to be a competition a prize for the most, or a prize for the most unusual textures, or the best patchwork design…

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Get wet!

  • dolls laundry. A big bowl of warm soapy water – the more bubbles the better – and a pile of dolls clothes; a clothes airer and pegs. I always make sure there’s a towel to hand for all the moments when it gets too much and hands or faces need to be dried before starting again. We use a toy shopping basket as a washing basket – it looks a little like mine, and I have a small peg basket with a handle which is great to play with. And of course my pegs are all sorts of colours so there’s fun to be had choosing pairs to go with the clothes, or deciding which side of the airer has to have which colour.

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  • Aquaplay. We were given a playset a number of years ago now, which clips together to create canal systems – each time can be a different configuration. It has straight and curvy pieces, locks, gates, boats, and water pumps. Once you have clipped it all how you want it you fill the system with water and can move the boats around, bring cargo from one side to the other, take action figures on boating holidays etc. It is wonderfully absorbing, has a rhythm and order to the way you have to move the water through the locks to get your boats round. Great play value. (Just had a quick look, and it’s still available to buy)

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  • paddling and pools are brilliant, especially when in the shade so you don’t have to worry too much about sun cream (the nature of kids with sensory cravings is that they often have strong sensory defensiveness too – and for us sun cream is one of those). Again, have towels at the ready, the end of this kind of play often comes abruptly & urgently in my experience. Balls, dolls, pouring, mixing, splashing, floating/sinking objects – and so many more ways to play. Put a paddling pool on a slight slope and you have water that meets land – a barbie beach, an animal watering hole…

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  • Ice cube arctic. Another paddling pool idea, but could also work in a sensory bin or tray. We collect flowers, stones, pebbles, feathers, cut up bits of drinking straws, glitter, small toy animals etc and put them into a variety of plastic containers – all sorts of sizes and shapes. Pour water in and pop in the freezer. When ready (I have put them in to freeze during the morning and got them out after school but really they last longer if left in to freeze right through.) get them all out into the paddling pool or tray along with other toy animals.

Get Trampolining!

  • Wet Trampoline – This gets slippery so careful supervision called for! All you need are full watering cans, and gentle bouncing – or water balloons plus bouncing – or to get the Trampoline wet with the hose before bouncing!
  • Ball pit Trampoline – simple, put ball pit balls (or a mix of different balls but making sure none are too hard or heavy) onto the Trampoline. These are amazing fun to bounce with, and also become (in our house anyway) all sorts of games – colour sorting, lining up, in or out, characters in an imaginary role play game (ie balls in our house all have names and are often at school when on the Trampoline, being moved to & from the shed in a school bus (push along dumper truck), facing time out if naughty, moving around to different lessons, taking turns to be bounced with etc).

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Get making!

  • Mud pies and potions – This activity needs very little resourcing or encouragement. Though I do steer to particular areas of the garden to find mud and stones etc, so my flower beds aren’t all dug up by the end. Similarly rules about which flowers to pick have to be agreed. I am always careful to be very near by just to make sure there is no eating or drinking of the pies and potions either… can never be sure. I am keen to create a mud kitchen over the summer this year, so am enjoying looking at other’s ideas – pinterest is an amazing place – and making plans.
  • Dens – made out of washing lines with big sheets, or clothes airers and blankets, or big cardboard boxes, or play tents. String, pegs, safety pins and stones to weight things down can all be useful.
  • holes – making a hole with a spade or a spoon might sound incredibly dull but believe me it’s absorbing, hard work, and full of interesting treasures – are you digging like an archaeologist looking for artifacts, a pirate looking for treasure or are you a bug hunter? It’s useful to mark out a small patch of the garden where you can live with this activity happening, or perhaps have a large plant pot filled with soil just for this. You might even want to bury some treasure for the digger to find! At the moment we seem to be finding a lot of broken pieces of kitchen or bathroom tiles – each with colour and pattern. They are then washed lovingly with a paintbrush and find their way to the fairy garden with all kinds of other little collected treasures.

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I could keep going – but lunch is calling… what do your kids enjoy, what activities make for perfect sunny sensory for them?

pine cone prayers

A couple of weeks ago I went for a walk around our town with my three and a few others, and when we walked through the park we started to pick up pine cones. Nothing new, I can’t resist them. Anyway a whole bag of them have been waiting patiently since, for me to do something with them.

It may be a completely crazy idea but I was trying to decide how to create a prayer board for the kitchen – you know somewhere to put photos of people or verses to remind you to pray while you are busy with kitcheny things – and I got to thinking about my bag of pine cones. I mentioned my idea to Andrew who made a brilliant suggestion of one of those deep photo frames that you can put 3D displays into. Today we found just the thing, medium, plain unfinished wood.

As soon as we got home the hot glue gun was out & plugged in!

First I mixed up a colour with what was to hand, kids ready mix poster paints. Then I quickly went over just the front of the frame, leaving the sides and back plain and removed the glass completely.

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while I was doing this part, Andrew came past & commented that we do a lot of these kinds of things now I write this blog. It’s good for us then, I said. Followed by, what a good idea let me get my camera!

By the time I had done the small amount  of painting the hot glue was hot – oozing onto the kitchen work surface… so I began to rummage through my bag of pine cones choosing a mix of heights and sizes, and placing them very higgledy  piggledy into the frame. I was aiming for un-uniformed, interestingly textured – the more sticky out bits the better, and little gaps are good, I want places to nestle photos and prayer prompts in amongst them.

I turned just one upside down, to be at the centre. I then added a couple of really small cones in one corner, and added some feathers and a shiny conker just off centre – because there was some hot glue showing.

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I love the finished thing, it would be great in the middle of a table or hung on the wall. We are planning to hang it, within reach of B, A & T so they can see it and add to it when they want to. So my hope is that it will be a practical and beautiful place to display prayer prompts and will help me especially to focus my prayer for others as I chat with God in the everyday, and that perhaps it will be useful to the rest of the family too. I’ll post a picture of it in use asap.

Do you have a prayer board, or book, or space? How do you use it together as a family?

 

 

A whole hour? Really??

Our church has been taking part in ‘Thy Kingdom Come 2017’ this week beginning with a prayer 24/7 style prayer marathon that will finish in time for our early morning service on Sunday, and our celebration of Pentecost.

Everyone in church had an opportunity to sign up for one of the hours in the prayer space – a whole hour?? I went with T for an hour yesterday, not the best timing 12-1pm – right when she’s usually eating lunch! Anyway, we packed biscuits and a flask of hot chocolate to keep us going if hunger got in the way, and we set off with Annie (favourite doll) quite ‘nervous-ited’ as T calls that funny mix of excitement and feeling daunted at something unknown.

It was less of an unknown to me, I had planned the room so knew exactly what would be there… and of course had made sure there were plenty of hands on things people of any age or ability could join in with.

We began the hour predictably, straight to the playdough mats. While she began we remembered the story of the Holy Spirit coming to the disciples as they prayed. And talked about how the Holy Spirit helped them share Jesus’ good news. We read the story of the wise and foolish house builders from a children’s Bible as T finished (and helped Annie finish) the playdough picture. And we began to wonder together what it means to pray ‘Thy Kingdom Come’…

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T knew the phrase from learning the prayer at school, so we said the whole prayer out loud together and she and Annie set off to another part of the room. To my surprise she didn’t stop at the library of story books & cosy tent with beanbags, she went straight to the table with the papers and odds and ends people might find helpful – blue tack, post-its, luggage tags, Bibles, felt pens, colouring sheets (yes, any excuse to design a new one!) & colour in booklets about the Lord’s prayer. I showed her the booklet she could make and how it might help her to pray, but she picked up the colouring sheet, sat Annie on a little chair, drew up another, chose a colour and then said ‘tell me about this wall Mummy’…

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Right next to us was a wall for drawing and writing onto, ‘The Kingdom of God is…’, with questions; what does the Kingdom look, sound, feel, taste, smell like? ‘Taste like???? how can it taste Mummy??’. I found the passage after the beatitudes with the passages that compare the Kingdom to different things. And read about salt! ‘Do you think we are supposed to be salty if we are part of God’s Kingdom T?’, ‘Ughhh! I don’t like salt!’. ‘Hang on though T, what would ready salted crisps (a favourite) be like without salt?’, ‘Yuk!’ said T. ‘It’s salt that makes them taste good, salt makes all sorts of tastes extra alive. Salt makes some things last better. And it can make things get better quicker sometimes.’ ‘Really? Wow, Mummy you should draw salt shaking all over the whole world then it will be better.’ I drew as I was instructed and we prayed for God salt, and God’s salty Kingdom people to make the world better.

Publication2We sat for quite a while, T colouring, me praying.

‘What are you doing Mummy? Are you still worrying about salt?’, ‘Not really T, just listening to what God might say to me as I talk with him’. ‘How will you know? Have you heard his voice?’, ‘Have you T?’. ‘It’s low low low, and serious… and beautiful’. ‘I think it’s also sometimes like this too’, and I laid my hand on her arm, ‘like that, safe warm..’, ‘With you feeling!’ T smiles, ‘Yes Mummy, sometimes’. ‘I think that when I’m talking with God and thinking with him he helps me with new ideas and thoughts, helps me see new things I hadn’t noticed or understood before’, I said. ‘So what do you need to draw there now Mummy?’…

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I asked T to come and pray for our town, we had wooden houses, trees, people & animals to put onto the map. We thought about places and people, and took turns to ask God to be with them, and help them. Then we saw the table with A’s globe on it, and we had to stop and look. A display of prayers from around the world. ‘Is there China?’, said T. She was fascinated by China when she learnt about Chinese New Year at school. We read the prayer from China together looking at it on the globe. And then the doorbell went – the hour was gone! It was a very precious hour, heartfelt conversation T, God & me.

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B’s colouring later in the day.