such a good idea

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It seemed such a good idea – pumpkin carving whilst talking together about how Jesus picks each one of us, cleans out all the yucky bits in our hearts, and fills us up with his light…

Sounded perfect in my head as I had run through it in my mind.

What could go wrong?!

 

Whether we just happened upon the wrong moment, or it was just never going to be a winner I don’t know… but it did not go to plan.

As we cut the lid and looked inside my gentle chatting was drowned out by expressions of disgust.

‘Yuck! It smells!’

 

 

The scraping and cutting out of the flesh inside which I had imagined to be a sensory treat turned instead into something that seemed horrifying to T. So disgusting she didn’t want to join in at all.

I let her have a go at taking pictures for me, but even that got too much and pretty soon instead of us talking together calmly about how Jesus makes us clean on the inside I found myself trying to manage a volatile few minutes as T tried to take pictures of everyone and everything! She finished off by taking yet more incredible selfies, with each face more and more exaggerated. Of course when I had finished and washed my hands, we needed to put the phone down have a look at the pumpkin and decide how to carve it.

Let’s just say, I had to go and hunt for my phone! Then before carving I had to take a walk in the garden and find and cajole T back into the house.

When I finally got her in, she made an escape upstairs and I was left carving (‘cos I have to finish what I’ve started at this point). Hope you appreciate my efforts – I opted for an unusually optimistic slogan, which seemed bold given the circumstances. It will certainly be something to reflect on… and yes I’ve been told, holes in pumpkins ‘aren’t meant to be that big Mummy’ – I’ll do better (if there’s ever a) next time!

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making gifts together

We are just beginning to make our plans and preparations for filling shoeboxes with gifts for children which we collect as a church and send around the world with Operation Christmas child.

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homemade flower crayons

This year I am keen to get B, A & T involved more and have been wondering if there are any gift ideas that would be easy enough for us to make together to put in. There’s something prayerful about spending time making something to bless someone else, and those times we do manage it I find it inevitably changes, and blesses us too.

So here’s a list of ideas I’ve found:

  • T-shirt headbands (‘lovestitched’ have an easy to follow tutorial here)
  • T-shirt neckwarmers (needs sewing) (‘lilblueboo’ have a good tutorial here)
  • no sewing tutu skirt (Simply Real Mums have instructions here), the same method can quickly also make a flowy headband, or wrist band.
  • braided bead bracelets (see beadaholic’s video tutorial here)
  • no sewing fleecy pom pom hat (great instructions here from Creative Jewish Mum)
  • homemade shaped crayons (valentine ones on Mumdot here) These can be any shape you have a silicone mold for of course.
  • dolly peg fairies/dolls – sharpies, lace, tulle, felt, wool and imagination! A quick google for ideas revealed lots and lots to be inspired by.
  • wooden car tracks (BuggyandBuddy share their instructions here for wooden track) I was wondering if the same concept could be done with felt pieces, which would mean corner pieces could be made too.
  • lollipop stick puzzles (Mum Endeavors makes some here)
  • a world in a tin/suitcase – you can buy tiny tin suitcases, or use a little tin or large matchbox. Buy a little soft toy or little play figure that will fit in the tin or box, and then use felt, pretty papers and tape to decorate in the tin. Maybe the box will turn into a bed for the little doll, or maybe you have room in the tin for a whole house, or scene for the play figure.
  • baby tag blanket  – will need sewing (‘wholefully’ has a good tutorial here)
  • stacking game made of cotton reels (Handmade Charlotte has instructions and a printable design for beautiful animal mix n match, look here.)

Well, we’ve made a start at having a go at some of these. It’s a great way to stop and chat together, particularly about what the children who get the shoeboxes will be like, and what they will enjoy playing with or using, and where they might live.

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a rainbow tutu headband

 

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So, we’ve been back from our camping just over a week now and the dining room is now about a third full of stuff rather than so full you couldn’t get in like it was a week ago. Feels frustratingly slow progress though.

Trouble is I clean, sort, tidy away and then turn around to find other explosions of stuff happening everywhere else! (just this morning A ran over a new bottle of shower gel on the stairs, so I need to add ‘vax the carpet’ to the long to-do-list) Not to mention the explosions of emotion – sibling negotiating, stress from the change in routine, overtired but fighting it, meltdowns and the odd paddy (often ask myself why on earth we need those – this family are just so very talented at full on meltdowns, you know, the ones which are non verbal, aggressive, out of control, last hours, exhausting!).

So with the constant spiraling housework situation, and the constant emotional/behavioral trouble shooting, not so good sleep and a whole church service to prep thrown in it’s been a long week. We also tried a new discipline – a Sabbath time together – last Friday eve through to Saturday lunch. When we have fallen into a pattern I’ll let you know how it’s going.

I’ve also been aware of all the admin that goes with our family life. This week has been particularly busy with it and it brings a very particular tiredness with it.

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There are the forms to fill in for big organisations – for health professionals or DWP which inevitably mean going through a process of putting down in words the hardest bits of our family life – the unseen bits. The negatives, the ‘deficiencies’ (I’d like to see them as differences but to live in the culture we are in these are things that become obstacles in an inflexible system). These forms are asking for evidence, they feel cold, I fill them in feeling I’m having to put my children into a box just as I’m struggling to fit adequate explanations into little boxes on paper. These neat little boxes are an isolated snap shot of a bigger, vibrant picture, but this is not the place for the strengths. It is an emotionally draining process, but the support and opportunities we hope for as we fill them in make it a necessary one.

 

There is research to do – to prepare and resource myself for the academic term ahead. This week I have spent some time reading up anything I can about how to teach exam techniques – is this seemingly instinctive skill (as we seamlessly transfer knowledge we have often learnt from inference over many years of education from the lesson context into the exam room) something that can be broken down into steps or rules that can be taught? What are the ‘rules’ that unlock the meaning of an essay question? How can I teach how to find the question in amongst all the words? Do these questions have a knock on effect on how I need to be supporting the process of learning how to read for meaning while T is still an early reader? I also need to find out how to explain what ‘revision’ might actually look like in practice. How do others do it? What might work for us? Can we find ways we are comfortable with if we really think outside the box. How does B learn best, remember things best? How can I best help her to find a pattern that will be manageable, and how can I best prompt and support her getting into the rhythm of it. And yes, I am aware that my research as I sit waiting for people to settle to sleep is one thing, that hard bit will be sharing what I find out!

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There’s also ongoing admin that gets revisited in the breaks. The visual timetables, the looking for the right visual timetable app (still haven’t found one we’re happy with), the updating of the behaviour agreements which get carefully discussed with each separately and agreed on (including appropriate consequences if we go beyond 3), signed and displayed. We use the 1,2,3 magic style agreements to work on 3 behaviours only at any given time. All other difficult behaviours we try to distract away from and prevent, but the 3 we agree to work on together we try to consistently work on in a ‘zero tolerance’ way till they improve. Really good to see improvements in the ones we had been working on last term… we no longer need ‘hiding the hairbrush’ on the agreement! We also have agreed parental controls limiting the time spent on computers in term time, but these will be looked over nearer the end of the holidays.

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I also want to think about what pattern or book we are going to use next for regular Bible reading and reflection with each of them this coming term and get into a pattern with them. I quite enjoy the way we often need to be creative to make this manageable but the process of choosing the right thing together and enthusing takes time and is a bit fraught at times so I need to begin…

Anyway – it all has to be done… but right now, I’ve been ‘called away’ ( ie: pulled from my chair and demanded) to be the teacher again for T’s dolls Annie and Lucy who happen to be dairy and gluten intolerant, struggle with being left and come with a whole heap of admin of their own!! But it’s ok, I’m meticulously told the script and stage directions as we go so at least I know what I’m doing – it also helps that we’re now a few days into the game so I’m getting the hang of it – and finding I’m having to be corrected slightly less often!!

 

sunny sensory

Sunny weather is here… it has been incredibly hot in the last few days. So I’ve been reminding myself of all the sensory rich go-to activities we enjoy outside – and have been looking for inspiration for new ones!

Get creative!

  • water painting the patio (& walls, stones, benches, windows…anything that stays still long enough!) Just a plastic container for water & a range of different sized brushes or sponges. We also enjoy dipping biscuit cutters into the water and ‘printing’ their shapes, or of course getting hands and feet wet enough to print with them. Pictures dry up quite quickly so we never seem to run out of space. Though worth having a camera at the ready to capture pictures they don’t want to lose…

 

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T’s wonderful water painting of a bicycle

  • sand pit play is always a winner. Great for digging, mixing, building and shaping. Great for storytelling type play with action figures or dolls or toy animals. It’s also a great place to remember Bible stories together in that wind down part of the day.

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  • Painting & decorating! Painting outside can go big. Paint onto card, or large paper, or an old sheet. Get a great big box and cut a door into it, then paint away – add windows with views, pictures on the walls, brick work… wherever your imagination takes you. When it is dry bring out dressing up clothes & a picnic and enjoy your new playhouse…
  • Texture treasure hunts don’t need any planning at all! A piece of paper each, a box of wax crayons, and ready steady GO! See how many different textures or patterns you can take a rubbing of as you fill the paper up like a patchwork. If it needs to be a competition a prize for the most, or a prize for the most unusual textures, or the best patchwork design…

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Get wet!

  • dolls laundry. A big bowl of warm soapy water – the more bubbles the better – and a pile of dolls clothes; a clothes airer and pegs. I always make sure there’s a towel to hand for all the moments when it gets too much and hands or faces need to be dried before starting again. We use a toy shopping basket as a washing basket – it looks a little like mine, and I have a small peg basket with a handle which is great to play with. And of course my pegs are all sorts of colours so there’s fun to be had choosing pairs to go with the clothes, or deciding which side of the airer has to have which colour.

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  • Aquaplay. We were given a playset a number of years ago now, which clips together to create canal systems – each time can be a different configuration. It has straight and curvy pieces, locks, gates, boats, and water pumps. Once you have clipped it all how you want it you fill the system with water and can move the boats around, bring cargo from one side to the other, take action figures on boating holidays etc. It is wonderfully absorbing, has a rhythm and order to the way you have to move the water through the locks to get your boats round. Great play value. (Just had a quick look, and it’s still available to buy)

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  • paddling and pools are brilliant, especially when in the shade so you don’t have to worry too much about sun cream (the nature of kids with sensory cravings is that they often have strong sensory defensiveness too – and for us sun cream is one of those). Again, have towels at the ready, the end of this kind of play often comes abruptly & urgently in my experience. Balls, dolls, pouring, mixing, splashing, floating/sinking objects – and so many more ways to play. Put a paddling pool on a slight slope and you have water that meets land – a barbie beach, an animal watering hole…

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  • Ice cube arctic. Another paddling pool idea, but could also work in a sensory bin or tray. We collect flowers, stones, pebbles, feathers, cut up bits of drinking straws, glitter, small toy animals etc and put them into a variety of plastic containers – all sorts of sizes and shapes. Pour water in and pop in the freezer. When ready (I have put them in to freeze during the morning and got them out after school but really they last longer if left in to freeze right through.) get them all out into the paddling pool or tray along with other toy animals.

Get Trampolining!

  • Wet Trampoline – This gets slippery so careful supervision called for! All you need are full watering cans, and gentle bouncing – or water balloons plus bouncing – or to get the Trampoline wet with the hose before bouncing!
  • Ball pit Trampoline – simple, put ball pit balls (or a mix of different balls but making sure none are too hard or heavy) onto the Trampoline. These are amazing fun to bounce with, and also become (in our house anyway) all sorts of games – colour sorting, lining up, in or out, characters in an imaginary role play game (ie balls in our house all have names and are often at school when on the Trampoline, being moved to & from the shed in a school bus (push along dumper truck), facing time out if naughty, moving around to different lessons, taking turns to be bounced with etc).

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Get making!

  • Mud pies and potions – This activity needs very little resourcing or encouragement. Though I do steer to particular areas of the garden to find mud and stones etc, so my flower beds aren’t all dug up by the end. Similarly rules about which flowers to pick have to be agreed. I am always careful to be very near by just to make sure there is no eating or drinking of the pies and potions either… can never be sure. I am keen to create a mud kitchen over the summer this year, so am enjoying looking at other’s ideas – pinterest is an amazing place – and making plans.
  • Dens – made out of washing lines with big sheets, or clothes airers and blankets, or big cardboard boxes, or play tents. String, pegs, safety pins and stones to weight things down can all be useful.
  • holes – making a hole with a spade or a spoon might sound incredibly dull but believe me it’s absorbing, hard work, and full of interesting treasures – are you digging like an archaeologist looking for artifacts, a pirate looking for treasure or are you a bug hunter? It’s useful to mark out a small patch of the garden where you can live with this activity happening, or perhaps have a large plant pot filled with soil just for this. You might even want to bury some treasure for the digger to find! At the moment we seem to be finding a lot of broken pieces of kitchen or bathroom tiles – each with colour and pattern. They are then washed lovingly with a paintbrush and find their way to the fairy garden with all kinds of other little collected treasures.

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I could keep going – but lunch is calling… what do your kids enjoy, what activities make for perfect sunny sensory for them?

sensory for rainy days

Whatever the weather we need regular sensory rich input in this family, especially when things are busy or there have been some particularly stressful events. Tonight on my way home from Rainbows with T it became very clear that more was needed – a 15 min walk took 30, it was raining and the feel of the water, the way you could collect water drops off the ends of umbrella spokes, the splash of puddles became utterly engrossing… it would have taken more like an hour if I hadn’t been nagging all the way home! It reminded me of B at a similar age, walks home from school on wet days were epic, and she would be so wet by the end we would need to wring her out! Wet through every layer of clothes, wellington boots full.

There isn’t always time for being out on rainy days, and sometimes it is too cold for it to be ok for them to get that wet outside. Here are some of my favourite sensory rich rainy day activities:

  • cornflour slime – so simple, and absolutely always a winner. Put cornflour into a bowl (fun in large or small) and add just enough water for it to be quite hard to get a spoon through, but gooey enough for it to slowly drip off the spoon when you hold it above the bowl. Apron on if there’s time, then simply give to the child… can provide food colouring to mix in – the mixing takes a lot of effort and so is remarkably calming, can provide extra bowls or plates, plastic spoons, knives & forks. Can add scent from food flavourings. Expect some mess, but leave it to dry afterwards and then it can easily be swept up. Don’t try to put it down the drain afterwards, again let it sit & dry out a little, then it can go into the bin

     

  • Painting not for the fainthearted but utterly brilliant! Most importantly choose a place which is easy enough to clean afterwards – if this is to be of use as a sensory input activity it has to be hands on & that is messy. Also have paper supplies at hand – as soon as one is finished I want to have a clean sheet seamlessly put in front of them, or the ‘in full flow’ painting just happens onto something else! When they 025_01were very small I laid paper on the kitchen floor on top of a large messy mat or newspaper and put ice-cream tub size pots with some (not a lot) paint in there on the floor too. Strip the child down to the nappy, place in the centre, and enjoy! The only job to do is to be ready to keep steering them back onto the paper, and to judge that perfect moment to end the activity. Andrew & I had a routine for the ending of this particular activity – it was warranted, it is very messy – he would run a bath when I placed B on the paper, and have it ready so I could pick her up and go straight there with her when we finished (at arms length if possible!).
  • Daytime baths are contained (on the whole), and easy to organise. We have a whole box of toys suitable to go in the bath but mine are equally happy with measuring spoons, plastic jugs, whisks, empty bottles and will pour, empty and fill for some time. Bubbles in the bath are a change – though with eczema aren’t helpful, we have also used blowing bubbles while in the bath which has worked but was tricky in that it was very exciting and so it was difficult to keep them sitting safely in the bath. Many dolls can be washed in the bath, barbies can go swimming, lego boats & houses on stilts are fun, and plastic toy animals are great too.
  • Cooking either real baking (which has the advantage of being edible, lick-out-able) or the indoor equivalent of potion making or mud pies with a few rationed basic ingredients like flour, semolina, rice etc. and some cake cases in a tin – to be honest it’s been a while since we encouraged that, T is very happy with the tub of baking beans and cake cases which is far less mess & waste.
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early baking with Nanny

  • sensory tray – an idea that came out of desperation I think, but we have a fairly deep sided large-ish wooden tray, and when B was little couscous rice, and lentils would get poured into it. sometimes she sat in it and enjoyed the feel of it on bare feet and hands. Other times I put cars or plastic animals in, or big spoons for scooping, or plastic garden tools which made good patterns and noises against the grains as well as scooping.
  • playdough goes without saying, it is great for calming, ordering, creative play. When you make your own playdough you can colour as you want, or can add scent, or even glitter. I use the cooked playdough method mostly (which is incidently good stress relief for me too, requiring plenty of hard going stirring as it heats), and when it has cooled enough the kids love kneading it till it’s glossy – it’s cosy warm and pliable.
  • 2015-12-07 23.04.49making sensory jars to use in a calming down space or that will fit into a handbag to come out & about with us is a lovely activity in itself. The treasure hunting for things to hide in it, the funnel and pouring of sand and glitter and the designing of the labels and ‘I Spy’ tag.
  • washing up – only carefully selected items not the whole family’s dishes after a meal, and with eczema not very often either! But it is well loved, and has a social element which many of the others don’t need to. This does need someone involved to dry up and keep the supply of safe items to wash.
  • marbles another quite by accident discovery when B was small, we found that marbles spin gently around a large wooden plate we have, making a beautiful noise, and satisfyingly gradually making their way to the centre. We have a marble run too, which is much noisier (a much more rattling noise) but sometimes that is just the thing.

What else do you find yourself reaching for? What do yours find calming & enriching?